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= Using Open Source Software for Undergraduate Courses =

=== Organizers ===

 * Karl-Dieter Crisman [email protected]
 * Marshall Hampton [email protected]
 * David Joyner [email protected]

=== Session Description ===

The open source software paradigm provides freely available and freely modifiable software to anyone with an internet connection, including much mathematics software. Some of the most familiar to the math community are LaTeX and the Firefox web browser, but there are many other high-quality projects as well. Two reasons this software is appropriate for use in the undergraduate curriculum are its affordability for institutions where this is a limiting factor, and the ability for advanced students with programming experience to see the inner workings of, contribute to, and improve upon software they constantly use. This panel will describe and demonstrate a variety of successful uses of open source software in contexts ranging from the introductory classroom to senior projects.

=== Panelists ===

 * David Joyner, US Naval Academy, [[http://sage.math.washington.edu/home/wdj/sagedays/ams2009/talks/joyner-sage-and-diffyq-teaching.pdf | Differential Equations with Sage]]
 * John Verzani, CUNY, [[http://sage.math.washington.edu/home/wdj/sagedays/ams2009/talks/verzani-RinIntroStats.pdf | Introductory Statistics with R]]
 * Michael Gage, University of Rochester, [[http://sage.math.washington.edu/home/wdj/sagedays/ams2009/talks/gage-webwork-2009_JMM.pdf | Webwork]]
 * Robert Miller, University of Washington, Undergraduate Research and Open Source

=== MAA blurb ===

Using Open Source Software for Undergraduate Course, Tuesday 1:00 p.m.–2:20 p.m., organized by Karl-Dieter Crisman, Gordon College; Marshall Hampton, University of Minnesota, Duluth; and David Joyner, United States Naval Academy. The open source software paradigm provides freely available and freely modifiable software to anyone with an internet connection, including much mathematics software. Some of the most familiar to the math community are LaTeX and the Firefox web browser, but there are many other high-quality projects as well. Two reasons this software is appropriate for use in the undergraduate curriculum are its affordability for institutions where this is a limiting factor, and the ability for advanced students with programming experience to see the inner workings of, contribute to, and improve upon software they constantly use. This panel will describe and demonstrate a variety of successful uses of open source software in contexts ranging from the introductory classroom to senior projects. Panelists will include: John Verzani, CUNY, “Introductory Statistics with R”; Michael Gage, University of Rochester, WebWorK; and David Joyner, Differential Equations with Sage.

AMS 2008 Booth

There will be a Sage booth at the winter joint mathematics meeting in San Diego. There will be a coding sprint at the booth.

The main booth organizer is William Stein.

AMS/MAA Joint Meetings 2009 Booth

There will be a Sage booth at the winter joint mathematics meeting in Washington, DC, January 5 - 8, 2009.

Please add your name below if you are planning on attending and can help out in the booth:

  • Marshall Hampton
  • David Joyner
  • David Harvey
  • Mike Hansen
  • Jason Grout

Please add your name below if you will be at the meetings, and even just plan on stopping by.

  • Kiran Kedlaya

AMS Special Session on Sage and Mathematical Research Using Open Source Software

  • The purpose of this session is to bring together those who develop and/or use or would like to use the mathematical software system Sage and related open source software in their research. The Sage session abstracts will be published in the CCA.

Organizers

The time slots scheduled are:

  • Thursday, January 8, 2009: 8:00-10:50 AM
  • Thursday, January 8, 2009: 1:00-5:50 PM

Attendees (tentative)

AMS session webpage

Tentative schedule

Using Open Source Software for Undergraduate Courses

Organizers

Session Description

The open source software paradigm provides freely available and freely modifiable software to anyone with an internet connection, including much mathematics software. Some of the most familiar to the math community are LaTeX and the Firefox web browser, but there are many other high-quality projects as well. Two reasons this software is appropriate for use in the undergraduate curriculum are its affordability for institutions where this is a limiting factor, and the ability for advanced students with programming experience to see the inner workings of, contribute to, and improve upon software they constantly use. This panel will describe and demonstrate a variety of successful uses of open source software in contexts ranging from the introductory classroom to senior projects.

Panelists

MAA blurb

Using Open Source Software for Undergraduate Course, Tuesday 1:00 p.m.–2:20 p.m., organized by Karl-Dieter Crisman, Gordon College; Marshall Hampton, University of Minnesota, Duluth; and David Joyner, United States Naval Academy. The open source software paradigm provides freely available and freely modifiable software to anyone with an internet connection, including much mathematics software. Some of the most familiar to the math community are LaTeX and the Firefox web browser, but there are many other high-quality projects as well. Two reasons this software is appropriate for use in the undergraduate curriculum are its affordability for institutions where this is a limiting factor, and the ability for advanced students with programming experience to see the inner workings of, contribute to, and improve upon software they constantly use. This panel will describe and demonstrate a variety of successful uses of open source software in contexts ranging from the introductory classroom to senior projects. Panelists will include: John Verzani, CUNY, “Introductory Statistics with R”; Michael Gage, University of Rochester, WebWorK; and David Joyner, Differential Equations with Sage.

ams (last edited 2017-02-02 21:33:47 by mrennekamp)